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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 126 (some duplicates have been removed)
evacuations in the low-lying areas of queens and brooklyn. he ordered that in hurricane irene and thankfully, there were no problems at that time. but officials taking this very seriously, potentially flooding in brooklyn and queens on the atlantic ocean and new york bay, as hurricane sandy bears down on the northeast. we will have continuing live coverage, throughout the hour. >> the fox extreme weather alert for you, the national hurricane center issuing the latest advisory on hurricane sandy, set to strike in the north evert. a rare super storm. the hurricane lashing north carolina with pounding winds and rain. massive waves are crashing ark shore on the outer banks. people in connecticut are bracing for the worst with the governor declaring a state of emergency there. let's return to our chief meteorologist. you know, rick, we heard mayor michael bloomberg ordering mandatory evacuations for low-lying areas in brooklyn and queens. you are talking about hundreds and thousands of people and shutting down the subway and buses. >> this happened last year in hurricane irene and it wasn't that
, ladies and gentlemen, i stood in this very spot a year ago for hurricane irene. there were some similar dire warnings then, and when the storm came, it actually leapfrogged over new york city and landed further up the hudson river and caused considerable damage there, although we didn't know it as the storm was happening and one of the things i've learned in 40 years of coverage these events is that it is always worse than it initially seems because you begin to tally the damage once daylight comes and once things get more calm. but this will not be like a traditional hurricane, this will not be something that happens in six or eight hours and then we're on with our lives and this is an enduring event, it is the collision of the three big weather systems, the tropical hurricanes, the frigid winds coming down from the north and that western low pressure system, everything's going to get churned around and it's going to be part of our lives, unfortunately, for several days, and i think, i fear that before this is over, it's going to be a story with many, many tragic ramifications. but sta
you can see the trees. hurricane irene they lost enough trees. $22,000 worth of trees fell down. this storm expected to be much tougher, more devastating than hurricane irene. look at this. that's a scaffold around an art project. new york city is full of scaffolding like that. things that we are watching today. want to head it over now to "cnn newsroom." newsroom." they're up next. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good morning to you. i sure hope you're keeping dry somewhere. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for being with us. we begin this morning with hurricane sandy, within hours expected to explode into this superstorm. most of us have never season anything like it in our lifetime. already huge, tropical storm force winds spanning a width of nearly 1,000 mimes. it's aiming at the heart of the east coast, the most heavily populated corridor in the country. 50 million people are expected to feel the effects. hundreds of thousands are now under evacuation orders. fema predicts damage costs of about $3 billion just for wind damage alone. heavy rains or snow, storm
year with irene. we thought it was going to be such a big event for new york and it was a dud. it wasn't a big dud for vermont, new hampshire, new jersey, because of the flooding. but this is what we have to work through right now. this storm that looks like that, like just literally nothing, still a small category 1 hurricane, but can this morph literally into something that will have 80 to 90 mile per hour winds, put 20 inches of rain down, and cause millions of people to be without power for days and probably some for weeks. can it happen? yes. all the forecasts say that it will happen. but you know what, all the forecasts said that irene would be a worse storm than it was and it's not. everyone i'm talking to believes that this storm will be significantly more impact for new york, new jersey, maybe pennsylvania than irene was. >> it's going to be a tropical storm, right, by the time it gets up, by the time it actually hits the eastern seaboard? >> no, it will be a tropical storm briefly in here. here's the model guidance for you. the models are all right there. we put them into mot
. during irene it was 4.4. we expect to double what we had in irene. that's the problem. that's what kicked in yesterday and that's why the mandatory evacuation order was kicked in. the storm is deep in low pressure, and we expect the wind field to push this water up through long island sound and just to give you an example. you can see what's going on here in terms of how high water is. it's below the sea wall, but it's probably going to be about a good third of the way up this pole. that brings it all the way back into the battery and probably into lower parts of manhattan as well. parts of wall street will probably flood, so we anticipate this water to be much higher. the only difference in it could be the fact that it's going to come up gradually as opposed to quick like with the storm surge. not gradual in like 20 minutes but maybe over an hour or so we see that water coming up and coming up. we see the tunnels here shut down. the brooklyn tunnels now shout done, the holland tunnel is closing at 2:00 this afternoon. that's an order from the governor. when you see things like that occur
, when hurricane irene came through and the flooding that i've seen down to my left here, going out underneath the boardwalk, out on the streets where all the homes are on long beach is already much, much worse than irene. further left, because of the conditions here and the camera angle, you can't see it. but there is a lifeguard station that last year 14 months ago in irene was swept off its foundation. it's done it again. the authorities have been appealing to people all day to get out. get out of long beach a get across the bridge. >> bret: stay safe. we will head further south and correspondent steve harrigan is in ocean city, maryland. good evening, steve. >> good evening, bret. hurricane force winds here cracking over the seawall. 15 to 20-foot waves. part of the pier has been destroyed by the waves. the governor making a forceful statement saying stay in your house. this storm is going to kill people. we want to limit the loss of life. stay in the house. as many as 30,000 people now without power. as the conditions are likely to continue to get worse throughout the night. br
learned from last year's hurricane irene. here's the local mayor. all right, well, we talked to the local mayor earlier and they are prepared under 24-hour operations here trying to keep the lines of communication open with residents here who chose not to evacuate as well as keeping up-to-date with everything going on in terms of emergency responses and any type of damage that may come because of hurricane sandy, don and chad. >> sandy, standby. we have chad myers here again. sandy, you can play along in this as well. so we have sandra, chad is in ocean city, maryland, 200 miles north of georgia. georgia is getting pelted at this point. how long before sandy starts to feel what he's feeling? >> there are arms on this storm. they are almost like you see a picture of the hurricane with spiral bands. that's what we have with the storm. let me walk over here to describe what you're going to look at for the next 36 hours. i want you to know when you see it what you're seeing. there's the center of the storm right there, don. wherever there's color, that's where it is storming. that's where it
after hurricane irene which left people without power in that state for days. martha. martha: we'll find out what lessons were learned from irene at the same time as this last year. so many places out of power for so many days. we'll see whether or not we're in better shape this time around. airports across the northeast have been brought to a virtual stand still. that is causing a ripple effect for travelers around the country. airports across the new york city area are open. but carriers canceled 7600 flights. basically you're not going anywhere in and out of this area today and down to d.c. as well in many cases. some airlines added flights out of the northeast. so they can move their planes off the ground and out of the storm's path to other areas around the country. all of this adds to the travel nightmare and indeed amtrak as well is suspending their train service across the region. so folks, where you are is where you're going to sty for the time-being. the storm is shutting down the new york stock exchange. the last time that happened was almost 30 years ago. during hurricane glo
year, hurricane irene had less than five feet of surge. but that made driving through the wall street area an adventure. new york city is lucky to have the high-rises. be very clear. this ain't irene. the water will come. could be 8, 10, 12 feet high. as brave as you are, we won't be here tomorrow morning in this spot. >> we won't. a lot of tourists are out now, now gnat we have daylight out. there's much more of the storm to come. we'll cover it all morning long. >> let's take a look at the tourists. times square normally crammed with traffic at this time. people out there walking around, taking it all in. sandy has forced new york city officials to shut down the subways for the second time in in city's history. josh, a lot fewer people than usual. >> it's not just less crowded. everything here is shuttered. the winds pick up the rain again starts to fall. this is a subway station closed for business. not the only station that is. every station throughout the city is closed as new york prepares for the superstorm. this morning, the largest transit system in the country closed down. t
're all so unique. i try to focus on the consequences. for the northeast, i think after last year's irene, we pretty well reminded everybody northeast has a hurricane threat. >> all right. >> they would like to reopen trading by wednesday of this week at the latest. >> do many insurance companies cover this type of sdmer. >> many don't. they don't include flood insurance, water damage. many homeowners if they look at their policies will recognize that hurricanes in many cases aren't covered. they would have to buy insurance through the government insurance for flooding and many haven't done that. we might find out there are plenty of people after this that don't have the coverage they would need. >> thank you. >>> the presidential campaigns have canceled more than a dozen events because of sandy. president obama called off appearances today in florida, ohio, and virginia. and another one tomorrow in wisconsin so he can monitor storm developments. we have more from the obama campaign from orlando. >> reporter: good morning, charlie, nornora, and viewers in the west.
here. also when you think back to what happened with irene, there was concern about flooding on the sound side here of the outer banks, so, you know, this area is prone to flooding. that's something that everyone's keeping a close eye on. also the winds out here are picking up. they've been right around ten to 25 miles per hour off and on. the rain off and on. but the situation out here will deteriorate as the day goes on. this area remains under a flash flood watch and a tropical storm warning. so people are taking stock of that. they're getting supplies. a lot of peel pl-- people planng to ride this storm out. we talked about some of the people who hadn't boarded up their windows. it turns out there's a mix of people there. are some people who have homes here who don't live here, so those homes have not been boarded up. some people who plan to ride the storm up. that's what we're seeing here. some who have left the area. because when you think back to what happened with irene, irene was more of a direct hit. people saw a lot of damage in this area. this time they're expecti
, former dnc chair and vermont governor howard dean is facing off against ed conard. irene rosenfeld, the ceo of mondolez international. the markets aren't to be forgotten. at 8:30 eastern time, we will be joined by jim grant. we're going to talk about the best investing strategies for the rest of the year with him. first, let's get you up to speed on this morning's headlines. over to andrew. >>> friday we'll get the government september jobs report. could be a game changer for the election. we'll get a hint of what may be to come. the employment report coming at 8:15 eastern time. poll forecasters say the economy likely added 155,000 private payroll jobs this month. we'll bring you the number and get you instant reaction from joel prakken. in corporate news, richard schultz is pressing forward with a possible $11 billion buyout of the retailer. schultz and at least four private equity firms have reportedly started examining the books of the economy. at the same time, he is said to be negotiating individually with the pe firms on the details of how his roughly 20% stake in the compan
: well, we should look at irene. this will cause at least as much problem as irene. i expect this to get their act right back together and do not be viced if this is a category two or category three by sunday before it turned to the northwest. it is very warm water in the atlantic. very warm. we back in the 1950s. we had ten major hurricanes on the east coast including hazel in 1954 in mid-october which had a path similar to this but it was to the west. that want into north carolina and you notice this storm is attacking from the southeast, right? and basically, it is that path superimposed to the east so hazel led to wind gusts at 100. >>neil: what makes it a mess for the northeast, combining with the other areas? >>guest: what makes it, (a), it moves slow and intensifies miling water to the northeast beaches. that is first. >>neil: and it sits? >>guest: full moon and look at the way the coast is shaped. it is shaped so you funnel water into new york city and push the storm surge in. the normal hurricane like irene comes along the coast and heads for long island and we get flooding alon
before hurricane irene, chris christie told people in no uncertain terms and i will quote him here, get the hell outfit beach. my question to you, are people heeding his message to get out and get to safer ground? >> reporter: you know, they are. and you may remember, he caught some criticism for using those strong words last year after what people along the immediate jersey shore felt was an overreaction. certainly after irene's disaster, turned out to be a wise choice, especially for those living along the immediately shoreline. here in asbury park and up and down the northern coastline of new jersey, they have certainly heeded his warning. here's a look at the surf that continues to pour in. the tide is actually receding now. but i've only seen it go down maybe five, ten feet in the last 20 minutes because the actual surge continues to push water over what should be dry, sandy beach here. but obviously that's not the case. so i think throughout the afternoon, even though the tide is going down, we're going to see it hold where it is. and when high tide comes again later on tonight ar
. >> larry, people are comparing this storm to last year's hurricane irene the tenth costliest in history. now from its command center today, home depot sending sump pumps, shop vacs anticipating lining irene a lot of coastal and inland flooding. for home depot that means demand for carpeting picks up after the storm. if there's any extra profit for the retail that comes out of this storm it comes from demand not pricing. home depot locked in prices this morning just to make sure that consumers will not get gouged. as for paying for the property, property and casualty insurers in good shape thanks to higher premiums and a lack of major events. a major storm may allow some of them to pass on higher prices to their clients. restaurants will see business decline. restaurants like this group you see here can take solace from the fact the storm is hitting did your the slow part of their week. as for the power provider the big exposure these four have in the mid-atlantic region where the heaviest rains and flooded is forecast. any earnings risk lies in prolonged outages in those areas. farther
back there is a storm fence put up. as i understand it, when hurricane irene hit, it came about that far, maybe a little further out. and with a lot of people at first were hesitant to evacuate because they said irene wasn't that bad. most of the damage of flooding was inland and not here on the coast. as you can see, the coast is just washed away. it's completely gone. as i said, it extends perhaps about 100 yards outs in na direction. the same situation from the north and cape may in the south, down near at alantic city towards the tip of new jersey and the garden state parkway the main highway into that area, which bisects of entire state, has been closed off because they don't want people to go back into that area. it's completely vevacuated, and right now somewhere from here to there is where the storm is expected to hit. we're going to take cover when we have to. we're in a position that's somewhat prekd prekted. it's enough protected we feel safe enough. again, things are deteriorating very quickly by the hour. >> all right. >> reporter: back to you guys. >> thank you, ro
deep. that water has now come up, and we're well above the levels that we were during hurricane irene. that was expected as the storm surge now comes in, and as i said the wind picks up, and it's going to get worse as the -- as the evening goes on. all of the bridges now in and out of manhattan closed. the east river and the hudson river as well as the verazzano bridge that connects brooklyn and staten island. manhattan literally is now an island. there is also now the concern that conedison the local utility has raise that had they may have to do preemptive power outages, if it looks like some of the low-lying areas are going to flood to protect the underground equipment. they would do power outages, so so much for the utility of having utilities and elect call wires under a ground. that can be an issue as well when storm surges rise. we'll be back with more as our special coverage goes on. guys, back to you. >> thank you so much, scott. that's why we have so many issues with the exchange. that's the neighborhood where the new york stock exchange is. back to the dramatic picture in m
lessons from the last storm. >> reporter: connecticut is one of 13 states haunted by last year's irene, and the nearly 16 billion in damage, leaving thousands without power for days. then hit by a surprising snowstorm on halloween. today, governor malloy warned it could be the type of storm not seen in 30 years. >> have enough food and water for everyone in your household. assume there will be an elongated period of time in which you will be without energy. >> reporter: at the massachusetts store? power supplies were hot items. >> i have generators, make sure we have oil, flash lights, got to be prepared. >> reporter: storm surge is another worry, with a full moon, sunday night being a difficult combination, it sent the area in norfolk, virginia, out to sea. others sought safe harbor. and along the new jersey shore, these people sought safe harbor >> i may as well take the right steps, get the boat out of the way. whatever is going to happen will happen >> reporter: this boat yard couldn't keep up with requests. >> no, i'm sorry, we can't take boats out of the water. >> reporter: they'
island instead of bussing people off the island as they did last year during irene. and that's why we have a situation. let's walk over here and show you what the rest o of atlantic city is dealing with. this is an access ramp that takes you up to the boardwalk. so these are the streets of atlantic city down here. this is what it looks like. several feet of water covering the street. and here's where things became a problem. you have 400 people on the other side of the city who decided to ride out the storm and stay in their homes and as we talked earlier today, flood water was coming into those homes and there was no way for local emergency crews to get to them. so they had to mobilize national guard units to get those people out of their homes. things got so dangerous they had to pull the personnel back. so there were a couple hundred people still in their homes on the bay side of the city. the governor said it's a situation they will have to monitor and first thing in the morning at first light respond to and try to get those people out. not far from here just a couple blocks, one
is that we kind of had those same warnings for irene. i don't want people to go, oh, they just say that all the time just to get our attention. but, no, there is potential for some dire stuff going on here. and we're talking about power down -- power lines down, trees down, all kinds of other things. finally the computers are agreeing. and you can see a couple doing loops. if this thing does a loop right over new york or new jersey or pennsylvania, that means 24 to 36 hours of rain coming down an inch in an hour. do the math. that's a couple feet of potential water. here we go. the potential impacts, i think the coastal infland flooding the biggest. obviously we saw that in vermont from irene. the waves will be larger than 30 feet battering long island, new rhode island all the way to massachusetts and new jersey depending on where it lands. coastal erosion. we could lose homes as the beach gets washed away and power outages could be in the millions taking literally maybe a week to get all those power lines back up. and that could be far enough that it could affect the election. wolf. >> br
with these types of storms. we had your cain irene last year with over a million customers without power. rachel came through this summer knocked out the same amount without power. we've been through this before. our local officials have been through this before. they're well-trained. they have good plans how to respond to this. we've been communicating and people are taking steps to be prepared. so we feel fairly confident in virginia folks are taking the steps to be ready for whatever the storm might bring. jon: i know you have got the national guard out and ready did. you've got power crews coming in from other states to help restore power as well, don't you?. >> yeah. we know many of our power companies in virginia are prepositioning out-of-state resources coming in. national guard we deployed them in key areas around the commonwealth to be ready to deploy and help out local officials that might need assistance. we have our state police and out there. department of transportation. they have their crews across the commonwealth. they're already to go to help out as needed. jon: from virginia's
of the power outages. that is twice the number of houses impacted by hurricane irene last year. at least 18 deaths reported in seven states. for a little more perspective, how about this? one in six people are without power in new york, pennsylvania and new jersey. in new jersey we find ron, a spokesperson for new jersey power and light. what are you dealing with right now? >> we're dealing with outages to more than 930,000 customers. that is a significant portion of the 1.1 million customers we serve throughout the state. jenna: we saw that explosion at the substation. it was a big dramatic moment that affected power in the city of manhattan. did you have something similar out in new jersey? what caused the power outages? >> we did not have something similar to that we took some of the substations in barrier island communities and coastal communities off-line for safety reasons last night. our biggest concern is damage to our transmission lines of the we've started our assessment process and the winds will cooperate a little bit today we'll get helicopters up in the air to do an aerial ass
evacuations in the past 14 months. the problem is 14 months ago turn hurricane irene, that just perhapses, it does not do the damage everybody predicted. a lot of people that evacuated suffered more with the evacuation centers than those who stayed behind. everybody was worried that people would say, that's the lesson they learned, they're going to stay behind this time. we see a lot of people sticking around. couple of bars are open, they're having hurricane parties. everything isn't so bad right now, but the partyings going to be turning a lot of danger real soon if everybody sticks around tonight. there's no way in or out now. the main highways into this town are now shut down. and police are now using emergency vehicles, four wheel drives, they can't use police cars to get around. and a lot of these veteran officers are telling me if they drive around they're seeing streets flooded they've never seen, even big puddles on and this again, long before the worst of this stuff hits here in new jersey. tony, allison. >> steve, that is extraordinary. as you said, great concern because the wo
irene making it the fourth costly experienced? >> this is will be worse. three storms. we've never seen anything like this. it's definitely going to be devastating. >> gregg: i was reading forbes, i wish we could put it on o up the scream. beside for potential life and safety, economists are predicting that it will upwards of $55 billion in economic damage? >> yeah, it's hard to tell. we don't really know how it'sng. estimates are all over the place. there is one positive. sectors that desperately need more work, construction workers, electricians, plumbers all the rest, they will be finding more work. so there is some stimulus there, but again it's mainly to the negative. >> gregg: if you are contractor out there, this maybe the silver lining. the other thing, we have seen in past disasters that it dramatically affects unemployment and g.d.p. because those are tied together? >> absolutely. people won't be going to work. as you said, retailers won't be selling, there won't be tax revenues. and g.d.p. measures how much we produce. if we are not producing that much, with that many people
. the estimates begin at a billion dollars and head north from there. based on the cost of irene at the same time last year when power was out in new england. we get the latest on the storm now from bryan norcross at the weather channel. what's the latest? >> this hurricane is in the bahamas now. and it is heading north. and the big concern, i think it's going to dominate your lives starting this weekend there in the new york city area and all of the northeast. let's take a look at this graphic here. there's the hurricane moving north through the bahamas. it bends offshore but over the weekend, it's affecting the carolinas with pretty good winds right along the coast. and then early next week, it bends in to the northeast. we have never had a storm come out of the topics and bend in like that. so the thinking is that somewhere from props the delaware bay area, south jersey area north, this is going to drive water all along the beaches. and this has the potential to cause tremendous damage along the coastline and the whole scenario we had with irene in new york city and the transportation problems
irene hit this area a lot of people evacuated. the coast wasn't hit that hard. the bigger problem was inland. that's why [ inaudible ] behind this time but for the most -- staying behind last time but for now people are pushing out because of the danger, the high winds are obvious. we're in a very protected position, by the way, and we're going to move back if things get worse. but again, we're charting it by the hour every hour and for now, things here are under control, but again it's getting to be a very dangerous situation down here. andrea? >> i was going to ask you that exact question, ron. so you and your crew, you know what to do. but the people who are -- and this is repeating the president's appeal, what chris christie has said, mike bloomberg, the appeal to people who are refusing to evacuate because they are putting first responders in danger and as i'm looking at the pictures of you, ron, the shape of that beach along the jersey shore is never going to be the same. this is going to have to be restored in some way because the enormous erosion already is being washed aw
. and we went through hurricane irene, tropical storm irene last year, this time last year. but this is a lot worse as far as storm surge down here. again, right now we also know that 400,000 people about are without power here in connecticut. very dire situation. the governor briefing the media in just a little while up in hartford. that's the latest down here in new haven, connecticut. back to you. >> thank you. it's always deadly to underestimate the power of one of those storms. let's turn things over to meteorologist rob mayeda. we're anticipating that bad weather is going to move into that area soon. >> it is approaching from the south. right now, certainly delaware, new jersey and new york seeing the worst of the former hurricane, now just a supercharged nor'easter that is crossing the coast. winds sustained at 80 miles per hour. we have seen gusts closer to 90 miles an hour on long island. everything in purple would be wind gusts at about hurricane strength. that's a large area being impacted there. as that wall of water being pushed by the winds, over the last 24 t
. that is a worrying sign for jetblue. hurricane irene affected them. florida was one of their main ports and they got affected by hurricane irene. that will bring down their of the pros. just a year ago there was lockout and they didn't pass the faa taxes for the airlines. airlines pocketed that. this year the tax is in place. airlines aren't going to see that. david: okay. >> so we'll see jetblue miss. we have two bold estimates on the negative side. these are the best rated analysts that are below the estimate. david: we have to do this quickly because we're running out of time. final loser, the final one that will disappoint on expectations natural resources company called cliffs. they actually had a 6% bump their stock, so you're going against the trend? >> we are. in fact they also have analysts that are far below the consensus. the smart estimate is 10 cents below the consensus estimate. that says the best analysts and latest --. david: so people aren't confused out there. you see green arrows and plus signs. sri is saying no, this will disappoint. even though up today a big disappointment in e
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 126 (some duplicates have been removed)